Synopsis

Pierre is haunted by a persistent dream in which he spends the night with a beautiful women in a white gown who lives in an ancient mansion, though she invariably awakes with no memory of him. He is convinced that his dream has some basis in his past, but his mother scoffs at the notion. One day, he sees a photograph in a perfume advertisement that looks just like the mansion he's seen in his dreams, and arranges to meet the woman who took the pictures at a movie theater. While he waits for her, he encounters the mysterious woman in white, and as he follows her, he discovers a strange coven of the living dead -- a band of beautiful women who need to drink human blood to survive.

Director

Jean Rollin

Cast

Annie Belle
as Jennifer
Natalie Perrey
as Frédéric's Mother
Catherine Castel
as Twin Vampire
Marie-Pierre Castel
as Twin Vampire
Hélène Maguin
as Une vampire

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Infofreak N/A

Another wonderfully evocative, dream-like film from Jean Rollin.

The movies of Jean Rollin are an acquired taste. He specializes in haunting, sensual, visually impressive movies that frequently concern memory, or memory loss, and obsessively feature beautiful naked women, usually vampires. Maybe Rollin's therapist can fully explain why his movies deal with this subject matter over and over, but hey, I don't care, it sure works for me! If you haven't seen any of his work, 'Lips Of Blood' is as good a place to start as any, but frankly I've never seen a bad movie by him yet. They're all good. I'm hooked!

Jean-Lou Philippe stars (and co-scripts) as a thirty something man who becomes obsessed with a photograph which reminds him of of his almost-forgotten childhood, which is sketchy at best. He attempts to track down the location in the picture, and this brings back memories of a beautiful and mysterious girl (the lovely Annie Belle/Briand, who also worked with Deodato and D'Amato) he once met. He finds himself uncovering a family secret and his life goes in a direction he could never have anticipated.

'Lips Of Blood' is yet another wonderfully evocative, dream-like film from Jean Rollin. A truly unique film maker who creates fascinating worlds that are both seductive and dangerous. Rollin is one of the best kept secrets in horror, and a master of erotic fantasy.

Reviewed by suspiria56 7 /10

The Dream Life of Vampires

The films of Jean Rollin will be an enigma to many who have not experiencing his work, yet for those who allow themselves to be taken elsewhere by his cinema it can prove a highly rewarding experience. The viewer is often taken to places that invoke bewilderment, unease, and sexual desire. By no means Rollin's best film, Levres De Sang (aka. Lips of Blood) is a beautifully lyrical, slow burner that has the uncanny ability to take the viewer into an ethereal, dream like world, where the erotic and the neurotic are intertwined.

The story of a photographer, upon seeing a poster, is reminded of his childhood where a mysterious female vampire. However, this being Rollin, do not expect a traditional vampire movie (although his vampire films are arguably the most faithful to the Gothic aura and mythology of the vampire). Mostly dialogue free, with the acting catatonic, this only adds a surreal edge to the proceedings. And no vampire films have a greater sense of eroticism; it is easily to succumb to female vampires whenever they are on screen.

For the uninitiated, approach with caution. But this is a fine example of the originality and unique approach which is to be found in 1970s European sex and horror cinema.

Of which, Jean Rollin was undoubtedly the master.

Reviewed by pfaul N/A

A Surreal Bizarre Treat

This is my first Rollin film - and I loved it. Gloriously silly and surreal, I detect many sly references to Bunuel (the boring cocktail party) and Fellini (the cold empty beach like the apocalyptic end to 'La Dolce Vita' - did Spielberg get his floating coffins in 'Empire of the Sun' from this???). The nubile vampires are so unscary and unerotic - they look more like hungry fashion models with a penchant for nasal fairy dust. Who did the hero's hair - Leonard of London? - let's bring back the male bouffant! I think he got that knitted top with the zipper up front after seeing Pink Floyd 'Live at Pompeii'. There are so many great moments - like where the photographer turns at the sound of the doorbell - before it actually rings. What did this mean? Precognition? Bad acting? Who cares. I actually saw this on SBS TV (free to air - unedited). Thankyou SBS - a gem.

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