7 Men from Now (1956) torrent download

7 Men from Now

1956

Action / Western

7.4

Synopsis

Ex-sheriff Ben Stride tracks the seven men who held up a Wells Fargo office and killed his wife. Stride is tormented by the fact that his own failure to keep his job was the cause of his wife's working in the express office and thus he is partly responsible for her death. Stride encounters a married couple heading west for California and helps them. Along the way they are joined by two n'er-do-wells, Masters and Clete, who know that Stride is after the express-office robbers. They plan to let Stride lead them to the bandits, then make away with the loot themselves. But they aren't the only ones carrying a secret.

Director

Budd Boetticher

Cast

Randolph Scott
as Ben Stride
Gail Russell
as Annie Greer
Lee Marvin
as Bill Masters
Walter Reed
as John Greer
John Larch
as Payte Bodeen
Don Barry
as Clete
Fred Graham
as Henchman

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Nazi_Fighter_David 8 /10

The villain and the heroine make the hero a more interesting character

Like McCrea, Scott did not become exclusively a Westerner until the mid-forties, but once established he became a Western star of distinction, achieving his best and most interesting roles as his career matured…

Scott was a great gentleman… It was simple for him to do the part because it was indeed the prime quality he brought to his many roles as lawman or lone rider… Scott's best work was the group of seven movies he made with director Budd Boetticher in the fifties…In these he obtained a new stature as the lone figure on a mission of vengeance or similar private quest, becoming a tougher, more forceful character, the archetype of the much-parodied image… As we all know, a man's actions are what make the man, and over and over again, Scott believed in courage… He believed in conspicuous displays of courage… And finally he rounded off this splendid climax to a long career by starring with Joel McCrea in "Ride the High Country."

Boetticher's style was marvelously simple and economical, sticking closely to the same plots, locations and character types in each of his Westerns and stressing movement and action rather than ideas…

Budd Boetticher's "Seven Men From Now" is 78 minutes… And as concise as this great Western is, it has four really well-developed characters traveling through Apache country; beautiful storytelling; takes full advantage of the location; and there are a lot of narrative incidents…

Ben Stride (Scott) represents a man whose wife has been killed and he's going to go out and seek revenge… But his style is ramrod straight and not very interesting… The killers that Stride is after are all opportunists… They are men who had broken the law… Boetticher introduces a sympathetic bad man, Bill Masters (Lee Marvin) who had been put in jail twice by the ex-Sheriff… But you get the sense that Masters wouldn't kill a woman… That's not what he has in mind... But, surely, he wants the $20,000 in gold from the strongbox… Ultimately, he had to test himself up against Ben Stride in the final confrontation: the stronger villain against the stronger hero…

Lee Marvin stole the show… He had all the little tricks, and twitches, and schemes… He is magnetic, especially in one key scene on that stormy night, when he gets inside the covered wagon, asking for a cup of hot black coffee…Tension mounts when he tells John Greer (Walter Reed) that his wife is beautiful… He wanted to get on Stride's nerves… And some tension grew between the three characters…

Annie Greer (Gail Russell) was the object of desire… She was wonderful foil, essential, torn between two men… Obviously her character quite quickly falls for Scott's character… Her husband—who seems weak—turns out to be stronger than we thought... Stride let his own life down because he was too proud… We hear him says: "A man ought to be able to take care of his woman." This is the line that's submitted to a test by the whole action and script and direction of the movie…

One last note: Without sacrificing any of the traditional action elements, there was somehow an extra dimension to the Boetticher Westerns; they had a biting, underplayed quality, the kind of films one would have expected had John Huston (in his prime) suddenly decided to become a director of Westerns

Reviewed by funkyfry 10 /10

Bud Boetticher and me

I have a story to tell about this one. I had never heard of Bud Boetticher or "7 Men from Now" when I set out with my mom (a cool old lady) to Berkeley to see what was going on (she's from out of town). We found a schedule for the Pacific Film Archive and it said they were showing 2 westerns by Bud Boetticher and that he would be there. Well, I'm a sucker for meeting directors (very few crawl out to bask in the sun, it must be bad for their complexion) especially if they directed lots of b movies. They were showing "Bullfighter and the Lady" (also excellent) and "7 Men From Now." 7 Men is one of the best westerns I have ever seen, Lee Marvin and Randolph Scott are just terrific and the direction is amazing. I thought the kinetic energy combined with the extreme tension in the fights at the end were excellent. Now, after the show Boetticher and his wife showed up and Boetticher had some illuminating words to say. After that he met some of us in the audience, and I happened to mention how much I liked the scene where Gail Russell is in the wagon and puts out the candle and has a brief but oddly touching dialogue with Randolph Scott, who is lying under the wagon. What Boetticher said was "Yes, that's a much better way to do a sex scene, now isn't it?". When I reflected on this statement later, I realized what seemed casual at first was in fact a profound statement on film expression: Boetticher was telling me that what he was showing WAS sex. Maybe, I think he suggested, throbbing bodies and dim lights aren't sex at all. Maybe what so many people in my generation (I'm 25) take as naivete in classic films was....... dare I say it, TASTE AND STYLE???!!! Yes is the answer. And Boetticher's got both of them, hats off to him and everyone else involved in this fine film I hope everyone sees (and I hope I get a chance to see again and again).

Reviewed by hitchcockthelegend 8 /10

Another expertly crafted Western from Boetticher and Scott.

Seven Men from Now is directed by Budd Boetticher and produced by John Wayne's Batjac Productions. Written by Burt Kennedy it stars Randolph Scott, Gail Russell & Lee Marvin. Music is by Henry Vars & William H. Clothier photographs out of Alabama Hills and Lone Pine, California.

Former Sheriff Ben Stride is on the trail of the seven men - who whilst robbing a Wells Fargo office - killed his wife in the process. Mentally tortured by having lost his job that resulted in his wife having to work at Wells Fargo, Stride is totally driven by hurt and anger. But along the way he helps a married couple who are stuck in the mud, who persuade Stride to ride West with them in case of further problems. They are then joined by a couple of suspect characters who have their own private agenda for tagging along with Stride - all parties seemingly heading for the day when the truth will out.

Director Budd Boetticher and leading Western star Randolph Scott made between 1956 and 1960, seven intoxicating and genre bending films. This was the first of their collaborations, and although it can be said they were merely honing their "Adult Western" bent here, all the traits that would make the upcoming The Tall T, Ride Lonesome and Comanche Station so worthy of genre classic status is evident here in this film. Though simple in plot - I mean man on a mission movies are not exactly rare are they? - Seven Men From Now is boosted by a smartly ambiguous turn from Lee Marvin as Bill Masters, while Boetticher's ability to raise his complex and hungry characters above and beyond the standard tale further gives the piece some kudos. Incidents dot themselves throughout the story to keep the film from ever drifting to the mundane, while the location captures are gorgeous, and this is where we should be thankful to cinematographer William H. Clothier for realising that Boetticher needs his vista to be another character in his play.

Originally intended as a vehicle for John Wayne, who took producing duties instead when his schedule wouldn't allow him the time to star, Seven Men From Now gave Randolph Scott a chance to show just what a fine actor he was. As the troubled Ben Stride he could so easily have played him as corny and grumpy, but Scott gives him the emotional depth that Burt Kennedy's script demands. Gail Russell (Annie Greer) is the lady of the piece, she ultimately led a sad real life, but at least here as the woman caught between two men, we get to see that she did have the ability when called upon - even if this didn't relaunch her career in the way that her friend John Wayne had originally hoped for. In fact Gail was to sadly succumb to the alcoholism that blighted her life just five years later, aged just 36. Thankfully this film stands up as a fine way to remember her beauty and for the efforts that she put into the Western genre.

Lacking the heavy cloud of doom of Boetticher & Scott's best collaborations, this one, however, boasts richly interesting characters that are telling a cunning moral allegory tale. It be an Oater for those who like intelligence over yee-haw like histrionics. 8/10

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