Breathe In (2013) torrent download

Breathe In

2013

Action / Drama / Romance

6.4

Synopsis

When a foreign exchange student arrives in a small upstate New York town, she challenges the dynamics of her host family's relationships and alters their lives forever.

Director

Drake Doremus

Cast

Guy Pearce
as Keith Reynolds
Amy Ryan
as Megan Reynolds
Mackenzie Davis
as Lauren Reynolds
Kyle MacLachlan
as Peter Sebeck
Alexandra Wentworth
as Wendy Sebeck
Lucy Davenport
as Sophie's mom

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Emma_Stewart 9 /10

Delicate and refreshing take on a tired subject

Unhappily married man falls for beautiful woman half his age whom he believes will free him from his imaginary prison: this plot has been done so many times, very rarely with any creativity or passion, and so Drake Doremus' latest addition to the anthology, Breathe In, doesn't inspire much excitement at first glance. But Doremus successfully sidesteps the staple clichés of the infidelity drama and has crafted an oddly delicate, taut, and surgical film that captivates and succeeds in spite of a few minor plot conveniences.

Keith Reynolds (Guy Pearce) is an ex-guitarist whose passions and hobbies have been stifled in favor of a suffocating teaching job and a quiet home life in a New York suburb with wife Megan (Amy Ryan) and daughter Lauren (Mackenzie Davis, a real find). During Lauren's senior year of high school, the family hosts pleasant but guarded exchange student Sophie (Felicity Jones), whose presence chips away at an evidently already fragile marriage and Keith's resentfully upheld responsibilities.

Doremus' breakthrough picture Like Crazy (also starring Jones) drew its fair share of detractors for its unconvincing plot developments and shockingly naive characters. He still doesn't have a complete handle on how to let plots develop organically, and Keith and Sophie are destructive and weak-willed if not naive, but Doremus is clearly growing as a writer: the bumps are less jarring, the characters more understandable. Breathe In is expertly precise and poetically delicate: sensational arguments and wild sex scenes are excluded in favor of subtle tremors in relationship dynamics and a tentative, genuine mental connection between the two leads. A plot line that lends itself easily to melodrama is instead executed with restraint and grace: Keith and Sophie don't even kiss until over an hour into the film and instead grow closer through fleeting glances, shared passions, mutual desires to break free, and support and curiosity that neither have received from another person in a very long time. Refreshingly, for once, it's not at all about sex - it is sensual, but the leads connect on a profound, intimate level rather than a physical one and, strangely enough, there are times when you can't help but want them to be together.

Pearce gives his best performance in years here as vulnerable and secretly needy Keith; he perfectly captures the crushing regret and childish idealism of a midlife crisis, and his slow unraveling at Sophie's touch is beautiful to watch. Jones, for the third year in a row, deserves some serious attention for her work here - Sophie is a stereotypical faux-intellectual, confident she sees all and knows all, and Jones retains that adolescent conceit while imbuing her with a deep, affecting loneliness and pain and a quiet but steely veneer masking it from the world. It's less showy, but more intricate and adult than her work in Like Crazy. Mackenzie Davis' first major movie role is pretty demanding and full of pitfalls, yet she creates the most sympathetic character in the film. Amy Ryan unfortunately isn't given much to do, and occasionally her character feels uncomfortable villainized, but she gives Jones a look at the end of the film that says much more than a 10- minute screaming scene ever could and confirms that she is one of the most insightful and communicative actresses around. There's not much dialogue in the film, and most of it is layered with subtext rather than explicitly revealing, so a great deal of responsibility falls on the cast's shoulders, and they more than carry their weight.

Critics of Like Crazy probably won't be won over by Breathe In as in terms of direction, style and writing it follows many of the same formulas - a simple piano score, natural and unaffected cinematography, many close-ups and scenes where nothing at all is communicated verbally. The characters are less likable this time, and while they are more fleshed out and therefore easier to relate to, it's difficult to find someone to root for. But Doremus is maturing: there's less reliance on plot contrivances to move the story along, and instead he lets the tiny fissures, the soundless sensuality, and the growing tension drive the film to its explosive and agonizing finale. There is some great character- and dynamic-building here, and once Doremus has a better grasp of storytelling, he will really be a force to be reckoned with.

Reviewed by Siren555 10 /10

A Breath of Fresh Air

No mere love story, "Breathe In" is a quietly powerful film about two people who are eloquently and achingly swept up in a deep "connection" that defies description. To label this honest and beautiful film a "family drama" does it an injustice, but if that's what it is, then "Breathe In" is the best family drama I have ever seen. Felicity Jones as Sophie, the visitor, is captivating -- insightful, kind, and vaguely troubled. Sophie also happens to be a piano prodigy, perhaps an allusion to being a sort of "prodigal daughter." The film's atmosphere is masterful,an outstanding collaboration of cinematography, production design, and music. Breathe In maintains tension without ever becoming shrill,oppressive, or melodramatic, a balance that has been difficult to strike in so many of the "family dramas" that have come before it.

Reviewed by themusgrat 10 /10

Such an intricate study of a few people

This film manages to capture so much in so little time. Rarely do I think about a movie long after it's over, but I will be thinking about this for days. I could go on and on about the acting, or the direction, but that would do a disservice to what was actually presented. This is an in-depth study of a family and how their relationships change as they welcome an exchange student into their home.

Everything works together so beautifully here, almost too well. In a very profound way, these people manage to represent a struggle which has been done over and over, yet is captivating.

I'll be honest. This was hard for me to finish. The emotions running through the course of the movie were much too strong for what I thought I was getting myself into. Most classical musicians would have a difficult time with this film. In a single word, "beautiful." And if it had to be two words, the second would be "wrenching." I think we all long for this type of connection, but how to maintain it is the question that is asked of us. This was an honest and obtrusive peek into the way we live our lives. That's what separates film from art. There are many painters, many musicians, but few artists. Art is all about pulling things from people they didn't know they had, and I think anyone could gain something from this, if one can only manage to think past the here and now.

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