Gun Crazy (1950) torrent download

Gun Crazy

1950

Action / Crime / Drama / Film-Noir / Romance / Thriller

7.6

Synopsis

Since he was a child, Bart Tare has always loved guns. After leaving the army, his friends take him to a carnival, where he meets the perfect girl; Annie, a sharp-shooting sideshow performer who loves guns as much as he. The 2 run off and marry, but Annie isn't happy with their financial situation, so at her behest the couple begins a cross-country string of daring robberies. Never one to use guns for killing, Bart's dragged down into oblivion by the greedy and violent nature of the woman he loves.

Director

Joseph H. Lewis

Cast

Peggy Cummins
as Annie Laurie Starr
John Dall
as Bart Tare
Morris Carnovsky
as Judge Willoughby
Anabel Shaw
as Ruby Tare
Harry Lewis
as Sheriff Clyde Boston
Nedrick Young
as Dave Allister

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Quinoa1984 10 /10

"Bart, I've been kicked around all my life, and from now on, I'm gonna start kicking back."

At the time, such an idea of having the heroes being the criminals was un-heard of, but Joseph H. Lewis's film deservedly has its claim of being the little B-movie that could (forgive the mechanical analogy) by inspiring the French new-wave and other films like Bonnie & Clyde. The idea of having a tragic love story pitted in the middle of noir facade was also seen in the equally powerful low-budget They Live by Night. But while Nicholas Ray's film is more impressive on its emotional stakes, Gun Crazy rakes up points for some of its technical achievements. The style implemented by Lewis and DP Russel Harlan (also responsible for the great photography in Red River) adds excitement to the more suspenseful, even violent scenes, and adds some sentiment to the softer ones involving the couple. And I love the scenes where young Bart can't seem to put away his fascination with guns.

Bart (John Dall) starts off as a boy, and in some of these early scenes (some of the best in the film), we see how he is changed by an unfortunate act, and then the story skips ahead suddenly. Now Bart is an adult, out of the army, and gets re-introduced to guns once he meets his soon-to-be love and partner in crime, Annie, played by Peggy Cummins. From there, after getting married and needing (or rather wanting) money, they start robbing banks across country, but soon to meet their demise. But more than anything, the film's focus isn't one where 'crime doesn't pay' or some kind of typical, of-the-period nonsense. Like the Asphalt Jungle, we're given these conflicted, emotional beings who may meet their own ends with each other before the law. And in the film-noir tradition, it's the woman here who will act as a main catalyst for the end of them. It's psychological side of danger, pathological lies, and the pattern of a downward spiral in having to commit violent acts (even un-intentionally), becomes what really pulls in the viewer into the picture, aside from the more loose, on-location 'real' style and interesting camera-work.

Under more 'B-movie' conditions, Lewis sneaks in plenty of chances to look past some of the more cardboard cut-out forms the characters could have been. The acting by the leads is also very good, the script mostly by Dalton Trumbo is one of his best, and both understand how one reflects the other. Cummins is perfect in her part, even if Dall isn't quite as much a stand-out (though, of course, he's the sap to her more wicked side). Also out of the script comes cool lines like the one listed in the summary. It's a notch above many other B-noirs of the period, and should be seen by most serious fans of the 'mood' that came in noir films. A bit cynical, fatalistic to be sure, but it's smart too.

Reviewed by ccthemovieman-1 9 /10

A Bad Woman Can Ruin You!

I had heard a lot about this when I first discovered "film noir," and I was not disappointed. It was very entertaining. I still enjoy watching this periodically, even after a half-dozen viewings.

John Dall and Peggy Cummins make one of the more interesting male-female pairings I've ever seen on film. Cummins is one of the prettiest women I've seen from the noir era and fascinating to view throughout this movie. I'm sorry her other films aren't on video. She didn't do many movies in the U.S.

The character Dall plays is good, too, although in the end his constant whining over the predicament he got into gets a little annoying. He plays the nice guy who is led astray by the bad woman. Yes, another classic example of the old Rabbinic saying that "a bad woman will always drag down a good man."

Innovative camera-work also make this fun to watch. At just under an hour-and- a-half, this is a fast-moving, always-entertaining film noir that lives up to its hype.

Reviewed by bmacv 10 /10

Lovers-on-the-lam saga transmuted into poetic American tragedy

Joseph H. Lewis' low-budget saga of a couple of star-crossed lovers shooting their way across the modern west may be the most achingly romantic entry in the entire noir cycle. Apart from an awkward and superfluous prologue that isn't of a piece with the rest of the film, it pushes its protagonists, and the doomed devotion that binds them together, front and center in almost every frame. Other players skitter distantly around the periphery; John Dall and Peggy Cummins take and hold the screen (she radiantly and naturally, he more reticently and stagily), making Gun Crazy in essence a two-character movie. And what a movie. A young loner for whom firearms hold a fetishistic allure, Bart Tare (Dall) strolls into a carnival sideshow one evening where he encounters his kismet – sharpshooter Annie Laurie Starr (Cummins), the main attraction. As soon as she makes her entrance she feels his eyes burning into her, and when he takes the challenge to outshoot her, with each in turn donning a crown of matches to be ignited by the other's bullets, they both know they're playing with fire. He joins the show, but when their courtship gets them both canned, they hit the road. Their honeymoon wanderings are a forlorn sketch of American road travel circa mid-century, as in Nabokov's Lolita: The motels, beaneries and tourist traps beckon brightly but fail to satisfy. When a fling in Vegas leaves them broke, they sit dwarfed under the vaulted, Gothic arch of a diner where they can't even pony up the extra five cents for onions with their hamburgers. Plainly Cummins didn't bargain for genteel poverty when she set her cowboy hat for Dall – she didn't take him for such a straight-shooter. She craves luxury and, even more, excitement – blood. Only when she hints at leaving does he cave in to her bidding, and they start knocking over liquor stores, gas stations, banks. (The movie's only real playfulness emerges in the costumes they get themselves up in to pull various jobs.) But money isn't much good to them on the lam – shivering in a shack during a Montana blizzard – so they agree to head down to Mexico, buy a little spread, raise some kids – after one last job, robbing the payroll at an Armour Packing plant. Here Cummins' blood-lust finally erupts, and, wanted now for murder, they find themselves with no place to run. Even Dall's sister offers them a frosty reception at the family homestead ('Gee, what cute kids,' Cummins observes in a voice flat as a frozen flapjack). So they head for the hills where Dall used to shoot and cavort as a boy – and where he's destined finally to break his lifelong vow never to kill. Those final scenes of the lovers clutching one another as the dogs bay in the night, and amid the wild grasses and morning mists as their captors close in, approach a kind of spare poetry. A story of a couple of misfits on the wrong side of the law transcends its genre and turns into an authentic American tragedy. It's poignant and riveting, this ballad of Bart Tare and Annie Laurie Starr.

Read more IMDb reviews