The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 (2014) torrent download

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1

2014

Action / Adventure / Drama / Sci-Fi / Thriller / War

6.6

Synopsis

With the Games destroyed, Katniss Everdeen, along with Gale, Finnick and Beetee, end up in the so thought "destroyed" District 13. Under the leadership of President Coin and the advice of her friends, Katniss becomes the "Mockingjay", the symbol of rebellion for the districts of Panem.

Director

Francis Lawrence

Cast

Jennifer Lawrence
as Katniss Everdeen
Josh Hutcherson
as Peeta Mellark
Liam Hemsworth
as Gale Hawthorne
Woody Harrelson
as Haymitch Abernathy
Elizabeth Banks
as Effie Trinket
Julianne Moore
as President Alma Coin
Philip Seymour Hoffman
as Plutarch Heavensbee

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by gogoschka-1 N/A

Sadly, this doesn't feel like a complete film at all - but it offers a surprisingly realistic portrayal of a totalitarian society on the brink of an all-out civil war

It appears I'm in a minority here, because I actually liked 'Mockingjay: Part 1'. Now bear with me for a moment before you rip this review to shreds and please at least hear (or read) me out.

I do absolutely acknowledge that unlike the two previous films, 'Mockingjay: Part 1' doesn't feel like a complete film; it is practically all build-up and doesn't have a proper ending, and I agree that splitting the last book into two films was an inherently stupid, purely greed-driven decision by the studio. Also, due to that idiotic split of the last chapter, the film is largely deprived of the action/adventure elements that so many fans loved in the first two films, which must be especially disappointing to non-book-readers who didn't expect such a drastic change in tone. But if we ignore its most obvious flaws for a moment, the film has actually quite a few things going for it.

For instance, it offers a surprisingly realistic portrayal of a totalitarian society on the brink of an all-out civil war, and unlike other Hollywood adaptations of such tales, it dares to put the emphasis on the human drama instead of the special effects. And it remains faithful to the book: it would have been fairly easy to invent a couple of heroic battle scenes to amp up the spectacle (Hollywood is notorious for such disregard of source material - and such disregard for the fans), and I must say I appreciated the film precisely because of its NOT solely action-driven narrative.

But the most impressive aspect about 'Mockingjay: Part 1' is how layered it actually is. This is not the good-against-evil story of the first two films anymore: this is a really smart study on how propaganda works and how one fascist system is about to be replaced - albeit with the best intentions - by another. This kind of moral ambiguity (and again: faithfulness to the novel) is not what we usually get in blockbusters aimed at teenagers, and for that alone the film deserves some credit.

Also, what the film does masterfully, is showing how Katniss transforms upon the devastating realization that she has helped - or has been instrumentalised - to set a process in motion that she can neither stop nor control, a process which has already led to a terrible loss of human life for which she now feels responsible. She is torn apart by inner conflict because her hate for Snow and everything he stands for is bigger than ever - yet at same time, it begins to dawn on her that the leaders of the rebellion employ methods which don't seem to be all that different. The lines between what is morally acceptable and what is not start to blur. A very wise person once said: "War makes fascists of us all" - I believe 'Mockingjay: Part 1' does an excellent job at getting that point across.

Unlike in most popcorn movies, there are no mere black and white characters here (well, except maybe for Snow); instead, we get a story that - for once - hasn't been dumbed down and functions as a sincere exploration of an escalating civil war that threatens to consume everyone. And unlike most YA adaptations, the film doesn't shy away from showing what that means: the audience is left in no doubt about the human toll this revolution will take in the end.

Maybe the current situation in countries like Syria after the initially peaceful revolution that was the Arab Spring made this film resonate more with me than it should have, but I was surprised at how un- Hollywood-like this was done. And I can't stress this enough: Jennifer Lawrence MAKES this film; the whole franchise, really. The emotional intensity she brings to Katniss feels so real; it's the kind of performance that, in this kind of film, sadly often gets overlooked, but I sincerely doubt a better Katniss could ever have been found.

So my final verdict on the film: 'Mockingjay: Part 1' offers intelligent entertainment that doesn't solely rely on special effects and one mindless action scene after another. It's a fitting continuation of Katniss' journey, but - and that is the one serious downside to this film - it doesn't lead that journey to its logical conclusion. That the studio wants you to pay once more to see how the journey ends may be understandable from a financial standpoint, but it is a major flaw in the storytelling of an otherwise very good film. Likewise, the final chapter in the series (Mockingjay: Part 2) will likely suffer from having to do without all the dramatic build-up that Part 1 offers.

Still, there is a lot to like in this film and it is far from the boring mess so many reviews made it out to be: 7 stars out of 10.

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Reviewed by Vartiainen N/A

Why is this in two parts?

The Hunger Games story continues with the third installation, Mockingjay. And it's about as padded and needlessly long as every other two-parter we've had since the studio executives came up with this money-grabbing monstrosity of an idea.

Not to say you shouldn't see this one if you've liked the previous Hunger Games films. This continues the story just fine. Jennifer Lawrence still shines as Katniss Everdeen. Her presence and talent hold us through even through scenes you instantly recognize as needless padding and waste of our money. The returning cast is also as talented as they've always been and most of the new characters are also casted without hitches. Julianne Moore is perhaps a bit too... Julianne Moore to play President Coin 100 percent convincingly, but she has certain presence as well, that cannot be denied.

What bugs me is the story. The book itself was the weakest of the trilogy, though not by much, and it seems that its faults bleed into the film. Especially because the iron tight pace of the previous installations is thrown straight out of the window and we spent most of our time building up atmosphere. And building. And building. And... You get the point. There's very little bang for your buck here and even when something substantial happens, it simply lacks that edge.

Plus, they had the perfect closing scene, and for some reason they decided to keep going for about five minutes. Trust me, you know where they should have ended it when you've seen the movie.

This is a good movie. It still looks great, the main actors are brilliant and it has enough depth to impress through its story alone. I just wish they had had the integrity to go with one movie. It very well might have been the best Hunger Games movie of the three. It would have had two movies before it to build up momentum and steam. Instead it lifts up the pedal from the gas and decides to stroll over the finish line. Poor form, extremely poor form.

Reviewed by coatic 3 /10

Very Slow Pace; Almost 2 Hours of Melodrama with No Payoff

Let me first note that I am an avid movie-goer, but not a reader of the books. I did, however, watch the first two Hunger Games movies and was pleasantly surprised by them. They kept my attention, with plot and performances intriguing and action-packed enough to get from one scene to the next without a dull moment.

This latest installment is the exact opposite. The movie opens with some melodramatic scenes where Katniss (JLaw) suffers from previous trauma, then scene after scene just keeps rehashing the same weepy look on her face partnered with some sentimental background music. "Remember how President Snow tried to kill everyone in our district? Sniff." followed by "How could he do this again in this district? Sniff." then "Why is he doing this to my friends? Sniff." over and over until the end. Imagine that for 2 hours. That is essentially this movie.

Other scenes later on are just variations of the same - different scenery (a town in ruins, a mountain lake, a bomb shelter), different characters to ruminate with (the old flame Gale, old allies like Finnick and new ones like the District 13 folks, the sister Prim) - but they essentially are the same scene. I really wanted to tell the director the whole time: "Ok I get it, they are all angry and hurt. Now what? Please advance the story." I understand this treatment is beneficial at the start to provide some exposition on how the characters are brewing in their discontent and how it all boils over later on, but that's also what the first two movies already established. To fill 2 hours of the supposedly climactic final chapter with further exposition is just too much, perhaps unless you truly are a solid fan and have the patience to wait it out.

There was one final part in this movie that was intended to be a climax of sorts before the cliffhanger. It's the only scene that promises some sort of cathartic, action-packed sequence, but they skip the meat and flash-forward until after the event concludes.

There were, however, some good scenes of rebels rousing here and there that were quite entertaining even if they were also just more exposition fodder. At least they reminded me to wake up from time to time.

I think this is the unfortunate fault of the cash-grab strategy of trying to split the last book into two parts. The movie just feels so out of place with regards to momentum, which was a very positive thing going for the storyline in the first two movies. Even though Catching Fire was essentially just going back to the Hunger Games, it still felt fast and different enough to keep me tuned in. This movie managed to rehash itself endlessly and leave me feeling like nothing of gravity happened after my viewing experience... and it tried so hard to make me care via the melodrama, yet I am left unsold.

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