Beasts of No Nation (2015) torrent download

Beasts of No Nation

2015

Action / Drama / War

7.7

Synopsis

Follows the journey of a young boy, Agu, who is forced to join a group of soldiers in a fictional West African country. While Agu fears his commander and many of the men around him, his fledgling childhood has been brutally shattered by the war raging through his country, and he is at first torn between conflicting revulsion and fascination Depicts the mechanics of war and does not shy away from explicit, visceral detail, and paints a complex, difficult picture of Agu as a child soldier.

Director

Cary Joji Fukunaga

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by joey-ziemniak 7 /10

'Beasts of No Nation' has the best performance by a child actor that I've ever seen.

Child actors are a dime a dozen, yet Abraham Attah is something else. He transcends the category and remains such a demanding presence throughout the entire film, matching even Idris Elba's poise. His character's transformation is just one of the remarkable feats of storytelling that Beasts of No Nation graces us. A gripping account of modern day war seen through a child's eyes, Beasts of No Nation is easily one of the best of the year.

The first thing you'll notice is how beautiful the film is. The stark landscapes of West Africa draw you in, and the color palette for the film is quite something. Director and cinematographer Cary Fukunaga makes sure you remember the reality of this not-so-fictional story, paralleling Agu's family life and how his world was flipped upside down when he joined a group of mercenary fighters. Initially, Agu has no choice and uses them as an escape and a way to reunite with his mother, but the ruthless commandant (Elba) changes him.

The writing is fantastic as you see the war through Agu's eyes, and it's not pretty. This kind of situation is almost completely unfamiliar for most audiences, and Fukunaga manages to supplement fear for grace. He never lets us forget the harsh realities of war, touching on familiar themes like family but going a step further by making it personal for Agu. As the film is his story through and through, the adult details of war are kept to a minimum. The audience is just like Agu, unaware of exactly why there is fighting but rolling with it because it's his only choice. There's no strategic battle scenes, no planning on a map or signing peace treaties, as we are thrust into moments just like Agu is.

When the violence does break out, it's brutal and harrowing. Young actor Attah is ferocious yet sympathetic, and he brings these battle sequences down to earth. The creative risks that Fukunaga takes with these sequences might come across as pandering, yet they make sense cinematically and come across as action poetry. There's a certain lyricism to the war torn villages and jungles of the continent, and it's beautiful and unforgettable.

There isn't much dialogue in the film, but when there is it's brilliant. The unnamed commandant's ideology becomes clearer as the film goes on, and it reaches a disturbing peak. Fukunaga contrasts him with the initially innocent Agu and the two are at odds yet retain respect for one another. There are times when Agu could simply point a gun at the commandant and be done with it, but there's a humanity to the film that respects all lives. War isn't pretty, and Beasts of No Nation knows that. Yet this risky piece of entertainment remembers to be a film first and everything else second. The result is a rhythmic work of art with one of the best young performances I've seen.

Reviewed by bradencn 10 /10

Raw and Real

I was sceptical of watching this film at first. It looked like a low budget, and amateur attempt for Netflix to get bigger in their original film business. I went to IMDb to see what people had to say, noticed it got decent reviews and decided to give it a shot. Let me say, this is one of the best films I have ever seen within this genre.

Without spoiling anything, I will say that this is about the general civil warfare that exists in Africa, something most western, shelterd Americans have never even fathomed and have only learned about through movies. The film doesn't specify what part of Africa it is, but you know it is something that is real.

Netflix doesn't hide anything about the realities of what happens to families, children, fathers, and brothers, as well as the numbness the war leaders (on both sides, really) have toward excessive and brutal violence. Imagine: the film shows all of this through the eyes of a boy, probably only 12 years old. He is forced into a mercenary squad after his family is torn apart, and he experiences something that is even darker than hell itself.

That young boy, played by Abraham Attah, puts on a performance I have never seen before in a child actor. Given the mature content of the film, it is quite unbelievable that the torn emotions any child would have, given this situation, is so clearly displayed and authentic. Every scene just tore at my soul; I wondered if it was really acting. And he wasn't the only one; women, children, and the "extras" in the film: are these people really doing their first major film? Each scene left me speechless.

The emotional involvement I had with this film as a viewer is astonishing. I felt ashamed at myself for thinking my life had problems, for thinking my life was hard. I felt foolish realizing my immaturity in life, and felt embarrassed for us as America in general, for caring so much about things so materialistic and shallow, when people in Africa (and other parts of the world, no doubt), are fighting for their lives every day, being torn apart by corrupt leaders and greed.

To compare this film, it is similar to The City of God and Blood Diamond, but in an of itself, it is certainly unique. It's a masterpiece.

Reviewed by toby-brace 10 /10

Rare event

It's not often that a film induces a genuine change of heart in me, but this one did. I used to simply hate and despise the raggedy rebel armies of West Africa with their child soldiers, their cruel atrocities and apparent primitive mindless violence towards civilians in general. But this film showed me a side to them that I had never considered. I found myself feeling sorry for them, and the cynical way in which they were used. I realized that they must also have courage, and discipline, and belief in the cause. Like any fighters, they must advance into deadly danger. The lead actor is a child, yet more than holds his own with Idris Elba, a great actor by any measure. By the end I was shaken. I will not forget this film. And I will never think the same way again about the tragic and pointless wars of Africa.

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